Category: Edition 1 - April 2002
 
 

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pdf.png Editorial for Volume 2, Edition 1 (April 2002) - By Editor-in-Chief  

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What is phenomenology? This may seem a strange question to ask in a journal dedicated to advancing phenomenological theory and investigations. In addressing this question I am reminded of Kuhn’s (1970) assertion that science is both a human activity and evolutionary. By the same token, phenomenology may be seen as representing a human activity - in its broadest sense - characterised by its stance towards gaining a greater understanding of human experience. While not addressing this question directly, the current issue of the IPJP provides some exemplars of potential fields of investigation ....


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pdf.png INVITED PAPER: Don’t Call it Poetry - By Peter Willis  

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This paper explores the use of poetic forms of expressive writing in phenomenological research. The first part recapitulates the expressive agenda and its links with phenomenology. The second part of the paper looks at the genesis of a poetic form I used in recent phenomenological writing which I came to call 'poetised' but now prefer to call 'poetic' reflections. The third part looks at elements of poetry and their value in expressive writing. The fourth concerns the implications of linking art with social research. The fifth introduces a poetic reflection and explores a little of its so-called 'penetrative capacity' in research presentation. The final part concludes the project.


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pdf.png Humanising Forces: Phenomenology in Science; Psychotherapy in Technological Culture - By Les Todres  

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One of the concerns of the existential-phenomenological tradition has been to examine the human implications of living in a world of proliferating technology. The pressure to become more specialised and efficient has become a powerful value and quest. Both contemporary culture and science enable a view of human identity which focuses on our 'parts', and the compartmentalisation of our lives into specialised 'bits'. This is a kind of abstraction which Psychology has also, at times, taken in its concern to mimic the Natural Sciences. As such, it may unconsciously collude with a cultural trend to view humans as objects like other objects and so fit 'normatively' into the emerging world of specialised and efficient systems.
The present paper examines how the findings of a phenomenological study of psychotherapy reflect a movement by people in psychotherapy to recover their sense of human identity in ways that always transcend any form of objectification. Their human complexity is somewhat restored as they move back towards the concrete details of their lives where the human order has its life.
In addition to considering the implications of these findings for restoring the uniquely human dimensions of human identity, the paper will also consider the methodological role that an existential-phenomenological approach can play in supporting a broader view of science. In wishing to be faithful to the human order, it champions the value of the human individual as a starting point in human science and this includes a return to concrete experiences, the balance between unique variations and the ground that we share, and the movement from the particular to the general. As such, a phenomenologically-oriented psychology may have an important role to play in helping the broader sciences remember the 'human scale' of things.


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pdf.png Mental Ilness and the Consciousness of Freedom: The Phenomenology of Psychiatric Labelling - By Bruce Bradfield  

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Paradigmatically led by existential phenomenological premises, as formulated by Jean-Paul Sartre and Edmund Husserl specifically, this paper aims at a deconstruction of the value of psychiatric labelling in terms of the implications of such labelling for the labelled individual's experience of freedom as a conscious imperative. This work has as its intention the destabilisation of labelling as a stubborn and inexorable mechanism for social propriety and regularity, which in its unyielding classificatory brandings amounts to a tightening devitalisation of the freedom of individual subjectivity and consciousness.


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pdf.png Motivations of Farm Tourism Hosts and Guests in the South West Tapestry Region, Western Australia: A Phenomenological Study - By Gloria Ingram  

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This paper describes a phenomenological investigation of the experience of farm tourism in the South West Tapestry Region of Western Australia from the perspective of both hosts and guests. The purpose of the study was to gain an understanding of what motivates people to operate a farm tourism business, and what motivates people to seek farm tourism holidays. In this context, phenomenology was applied as action research into the human dynamics of tourism.
The study employs a combined methodological research model drawn from the work of distinguished phenomenologists to explicate the experience of hosts and guests. The phenomenological descriptions derived through the explication process encapsulate the invariant structures or essence of meaning for each group. The most significant of these structural meanings for guests was the desire to relax in the tranquillity of the rural landscape and so recover from the stresses of their busy city lifestyle. Hosts were highly motivated to meeting new people, especially those with whom they shared a common interest. The motivations for the two groups were found to be highly compatible which augurs well for the future of farm tourism in the region.


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pdf.png An Applied Method for undertaking Phenomenological Explication of Interview Transcripts - By Stuart Devenish  

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The author provides a description of the method of phenomenological explication he used in his recently completed PhD dissertation. The difficulties experienced as a new researcher in phenomenology are detailed, and the paper provides a record of his journey towards discovering a new and innovative approach to applied phenomenology. Finally, the paper provides a step-by-step demonstration of applied phenomenological explication and gives examples from his doctoral research.


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