Category: Edition 2 - September 2008
 
 

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pdf.png Editorial for Volume 8, Edition 2 (September 2008) - By Editor-in-Chief  

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The Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology now being in its eighth year of existence, it might be instructive to reflect upon developments within the journal since its inception in April 2001.
While the journal was established primarily to provide a high-calibre open-access publication platform in the southern hemisphere, it has attracted a significant number of papers from the northern hemisphere ...


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pdf.png Leaving the “Real Hume” in Peace and reading the Dialogues from a Moral Perspective - By Alon Segev  

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This paper offers a new reading of Hume's much discussed Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion (1779/2000) which shows that, in contrast to what commentators tend to ascribe to Hume, the crux of the text is not epistemological-ontological - that is, not the arguments in favour of and against God's existence - but moral. It is shown that, although most of the epistemological-ontological pro-and-contra arguments are quite weak, Hume's interlocutors nevertheless cling to their theses from beginning to end, with the reason for their dogmatism shown to be moral rather than epistemological-ontological. The paper is divided into four sections. The introduction to the argument is followed by a discussion of Hume's rejection of substance as epistemologically-ontologically superfluous and as morally bad. Thereafter, it is first shown how the concept of a transcendental God undergoes deflation and consequently disappears. Ii is then shown that, even though their arguments are wrong, Cleanthes and Philo cling dogmatically to their starting points instead of trying to improve their claims and to rebuff the criticisms made against them. In conclusion, it is shown that the only way to account for their dogmatic inflexibility is in terms of their moral position: Cleanthes thinks that society and morals will collapse without the belief in a transcendental God, while Philo thinks it will function better if we discard this belief.


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pdf.png Phenomenological Philosophy and Orthodox Christian Scientific Ecological Theology - By Allan M Savage  

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Contemporary philosophy, to be useful to Orthodox Christian theology, must capture the "essence" of the divine and human activity in the world in the scientific sense of Edmund Husserl. Scholastic philosophy is no longer an academically privileged supporter of theology in the interpretation of the universe. In its place, this paper suggests that phenomenological philosophy becomes the unique and transcendent partner, as it were, in the interpretive dialogue. The methodological thinking of Edmund Husserl and Martin Heidegger offers a way of philosophical understanding that is more satisfactory than the traditional scholastic metaphysics in giving meaning to contemporary human experience. A phenomenological eco-theological approach captures the essences of a subject's immediate and holistic perception of the environment.


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pdf.png Understanding the Inarticulateness of Museum Visitors’ Experience of Paintings: A Phenomenological Study of Adult Non-Art Specialists - By Cheung On Tam  

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This paper is based on a study of museum visitors' experience of paintings: in particular, the experience of adult non-art specialists. Phenomenology, a form of inquiry that seeks to articulate lived experience, provided the philosophical and methodological framework for the study. Descriptions and themes relating to the experience of paintings were generated from interviews conducted with eight participants. These themes were categorized into two major areas: the articulated aspects and the non-articulated aspects. The former refers to aspects that people can articulate when they describe their experience. For example, they talk about the formal qualities of paintings, related textual information, and the museum environment. The latter refers to aspects that people cannot articulate. For example, they have difficulty in expressing their feelings, their relationship with time, and an understanding of the role of the body. This paper focuses on the aspects that museum visitors cannot articulate when they describe their experience. This inarticulateness provides insights into certain overlooked features of the experience: the embodied nature of the experience, the way time is experienced, and the viewer's feelings about paintings. The paper ends with a discussion of the implications of the study for art educators. It is suggested that teachers should prepare students in ways that will enable them to make use of their various cognitive, social and cultural frameworks in experiencing works of art.


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pdf.png Heidegger on the Notion of Dasein as Habited Body - By Akoijam Thoibisana  

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Heidegger is often attacked for his failure to offer a thematic account of the body in his Being and Time (Aho, 2005). The general misunderstanding of Heidegger's negation of body arises from the different meanings associated with the term ‘body'. Body can be understood from two perspectives: body in terms of corpse and body in terms of lived-body. Doctors study body as corpse or object because that is required in their training and education. Heidegger's Being in his Being and Time ruled out all dichotomy of the body. The aim of this paper is to understand the Heideggerian perspective on Dasein as not a negation of bodilyness but a phenomenological understanding of Dasein body, and as such to highlight the dimension of lived-body in Heidegger's Being and Time. The paper will re-examine how Heidegger's philosophy of Dasein contributed to the phenomenology of lived-body in terms of his analysis of habitual body.


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pdf.png Maori Wellbeing and Being-in-the-World: Challenging Notions for Psychological Research and Practice in New Zealand - By Gabriel Rossouw  

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Psychological research and practice in New Zealand has a long history of a positivist inspired epistemology and a pragmatic evidence-based approach to therapeutic treatment. There is a growing realization that a more meaningful interface between research and practice is required to accommodate indigenous Maori knowledge of wellbeing and living. The dominant Western psychological view in New Zealand of world, time, illness and wellbeing results in practices that do not make sense in cultural terms. The medicalisation and classification of psychological disorders cannot account for the degree to which cultural and spiritual factors are associated with problems of living. Heidegger's analysis of Being and his phenomenological method of understanding these matters ontologically reflect a persuasion not dissimilar to the worldview of the Maori and their notion of wellbeing. It offers some direction to the question of how to better integrate psychological research and practice in New Zealand.


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pdf.png Leadership in the Management Institutes: An Exploration of the Experiences of Women Directors - By Rajib Lochan Dhar  

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As leadership is a key component in meeting the challenges of educational institutes, this study was designed to examine the challenges faced by the female leaders of the management institutes of Pune City, India. Data was collected using qualitative methods which included in-depth interviews with ten women directors. Analysis of the recorded data proceeded by means of a line by line microanalysis of the interviews, with the following five major themes emerging: (a) choosing teaching as a career, (b) shift towards leadership, (c) impact of internal and external pressures, (d) challenges from the male dominated society, and (e) balancing personal and professional life. The findings of this study point to the need for further research into the challenges with which female leaders are confronted in the educational industry, as well as for comparative studies with men in similar positions, and for the findings of such research to be utilised by educational policy makers to facilitate effective leadership by providing the necessary support structures.


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pdf.png BOOK REVIEW (by Steve Edwards) - Emotional Literacy  

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Patricia Sherwood (2008). Emotional Literacy: The Heart of Classroom Management. Camberwell, Victoria: Australian Council for Educational Research Limited (ACER).
Paperback (176 pages).
ISBN: 978-0-864-31809-1


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