Category: Edition 1 - May 2010
 
 

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pdf.png Editorial for Volume 10, Edition 1 (May 2010) - By Editor-in-Chief  

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The Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology has, for several years, received generous sponsorship from Rhodes University and, more recently, the University of Johannesburg, as well as being the recipient of on-going support from Edith Cowan University in Australia. However, this has always been on the understanding that the journal would work towards becoming self-supporting in order to ensure long-term sustainability. ...



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pdf.png Interdisciplinarity within Phenomenology - By Lester Embree  

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Recognition of phenomenological tendencies in several dozen disciplines beyond philosophy raises the question of how phenomenology in general might be defined prior to specification in terms of the agendas of the particular disciplines. After an attempt at an answer to this question, some observations concerning the possible benefits of interdisciplinary encounters are offered, especially for philosophical phenomenology.



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pdf.png Teachers Building Dwelling Thinking with Slideware - By Catherine A. Adams  

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Teacher-student discourse is increasingly mediated through, by and with information and communication technologies: in-class discussions have found new, textually-rich venues online; chalk and whiteboard lectures are rapidly giving way to PowerPoint presentations. Yet, what does this mean experientially for teachers? This paper reports on a phenomenological study investigating teachers' lived experiences of PowerPoint in post-secondary classrooms. As teachers become more informed about the affordances of information and communication technology like PowerPoint and consequently take up and use these tools in their classrooms, their teaching practices, relations with students, and ways of interpreting the world are simultaneously in-formed - conformed, deformed and reformed - by the given technology-in-use. The paper is framed in light of Martin Heidegger's "Building Dwelling Thinking" (1951) and "The Thing" (1949). In these writings, Heidegger shows how a thing opens a new world to us, revealing novel structures of experience and meaning, and inviting us to a different style of being, thinking and doing.



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pdf.png Becoming “Member Enough”: The Experience of Feelings of Competence and Incompetence in the Process of Becoming a Professor - By Thomas Friedrich  

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The graduate teaching assistant prepares to enter a classroom for the first time as its instructor beset by feelings of incompetence: indeed, learning to successfully display a professional identity is often a terrifying experience, such that promising novices may abandon it prematurely. This hermeneutic phenomenological study asks one female doctoral candidate the following question: What is the experience of feelings of competence and incompetence in the process of becoming a professor? The core finding of this interview-based study is the thematic demarcation of sequential stages in the participant's experience of the process of becoming "member enough". In the presentation of the findings, the identification of the central themes is validated with excerpts from the interview data, and their implications for the study of competence, the sociocultural study of identity development, and the mentoring of pre-service college faculty discussed.



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pdf.png Living and Learning as Responsive Authoring: Reflections on the Feminist Critiques of Merleau-Ponty’s Anonymous Body - By Ruyu Hung  

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Merleau-Ponty's idea of lived body has played a significant role in understanding self-construction and has raised issues about the relationships between the private sense and the public world. Merleau-Ponty argues that the lived body and the world are constructed reciprocally. This notion is acknowledged to be a rich source for feminist thought. Yet there is as much criticism as support of Merleau-Ponty's philosophy from feminists such as Grosz (1994, 1995), Sullivan (1997, 2000, 2001, 2002) and Young (1989). Shannon Sullivan vigorously criticises Merleau-Ponty's lived body as an anonymous body which erases particularities and results in domination. This paper defends Merleau-Ponty's notion by clarifying the meaning of anonymity in terms of the understanding of Merleau-Ponty's lived body as an "author", and as such as incorporating the capacity to resist anonymity, and sustain particularity and difference, through an ongoing process of authoring his/her own lived experience. Ken Plummer's notion of sexual story-telling is used to elaborate the elucidation. In conclusion, the educational implications of resisting anonymity are considered and envisaged in terms of promoting tolerance of difference and assertion of particularity by encouraging and developing the capacity to construct the self through an ongoing process of both responsive and responsible self-authoring.



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pdf.png A Phenomenological Study of Ginger Compress Therapy for People with Osteoarthritis - By Tessa Therkleson  

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This paper claims rigour and sensitivity for a methodology used to explore multiple sources of data and expose the essential characteristics of a phenomenon in the human sciences. A descriptive phenomenological methodology was applied in a study of the experience of ten people with osteoarthritis receiving ginger compress therapy. The application of the phenomenological attitude, with reduction, bracketing and imaginative variation, allowed multiple sources of data - written, pictorial and oral - to be explicated. The applied methodology used is described in this paper, with its six clearly defined steps illustrated by examples from the study. The findings demonstrate that phenomenological reduction enabled an indication of the potential benefits of ginger compress treatment as a therapy for people with osteoarthritis.



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pdf.png The Lived Experience of Losing a Sibling through Murder - By Gertie Pretorius, Julia Halstead-Cleak and Brandon Morgan  

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This study explores the grief experiences of young adults in the aftermath of the murder of a sibling. Three young adults were recruited to participate in interviews in which they described their lived experience of loss. Data collection and the subsequent analyses were guided by a phenomenological research design and resulted in the identification of seven major themes, namely (1) shock and disbelief, (2) recollection, guilt and self-blame, (3) rupture and fragmentation, (4) support, (5) justice and revenge, (6) reformulation, and (7) resilience, healing and growth. These themes are discussed with reference to the findings of other documented studies, and the implications for practitioners working with bereaved siblings of murder victims pointed to.



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pdf.png Health and Ancestors: The Case of South Africa and Beyond - By David Bogopa  

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Ancestral belief is central to such an extent to the world view of many cultural groups in South Africa that it inevitably influences health matters. One thus cannot talk about health in South Africa without acknowledging the reality of ancestral belief. This paper explores the relationship between health and ancestors in the South African context, with various case studies presented to illustrate the experiential reality of this relationship and the significance of ritual practices in this regard. Pointing to both intra- and inter-cultural conflict in respect of these traditional practices, the paper concludes by emphasising the importance of promoting cross-cultural tolerance and respect for traditional beliefs and ritual practices among both adults and children.



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pdf.png BOOK REVIEW (by Tharina Guse) - Talk, Action, Belief  

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Ian Rory Owen (2009). Talk, Action, Belief: How the Intentionality Model Combines Attachment-Oriented Psychodynamic Therapy and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy. New York: iUniverse Inc.

Paperback (435 pages)

ISBN : 978-1-4401-0538-8



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