Category: Edition 1 - May 2011
 
 

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pdf.png Editorial for Volume 11, Edition 1 (May 2011) - By Editor-in-Chief  

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The release of this edition of the IPJP heralds the beginning of the second decade of existence for the Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology. Not only is this significant because the release of this edition attests to the reality that the Open Access initiative is sustainable but also, equally importantly, that it is able to develop a pedigree stable of high quality academic papers, both theoretical and empirical ...



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pdf.png The Experience of Violence by Male Juvenile Offenders Convicted of Assault: A Descriptive Phenomenological Study - By Pieter Basson and Pauline Mawson  

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Statistics from both South Africa and the United States of America indicate that the phenomenon of violence amongst youths is increasing. This implies that a larger number of youths are being exposed to the experience of violence and thus present with the complex and multi-dimensional effects of such an experience. Past research has centred mostly on the causative factors that can be statistically represented, with little focus being paid to the juveniles' in-depth, subjective experience of the phenomenon. For the male adolescent, the experience of the phenomenon of violence is complex, diverse and may span across many aspects of his life, including physical, psychological, personal and social dimensions. Three participants were sourced from the Leeuwkop Juvenile Correctional Facility in Johannesburg and interviewed for the purpose of this study. The participants were selected based on their age (between 13 and 19 years of age) and the type of crime that they had committed (assault with intent to do grievous bodily harm, common assault or indecent assault). In accordance with the phenomenological approach, open-ended interviews were used as a research method in order to allow for the participants' unique and subjective experience of the phenomenon to emerge. The researchers found that the phenomenon of violence is characterised by the juveniles' experience of external events that provoke a certain response manifesting itself in violent behaviour. The responses described by the participants were mostly emotional in nature and included emotions such as anger, rage and fury. The experience of violence also holds certain consequences for the male juvenile offender. The most common consequence experienced by all three participants was their subsequent arrest and incarceration in a correctional facility.



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pdf.png The Lived Experiences of Mothers whose Children were Sexually Abused by their Intimate Male Partners - By Gertie Pretorius, Audrey Patricia Chauke and Brandon Morgan  

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Child sexual abuse is a global phenomenon that affects many families and appears to be increasing dramatically in South Africa. The literature on child sexual abuse focuses mainly on the victims and perpetrators while largely ignoring the experiences of non-offending mothers. The objective of this study was to explore the lived experiences of mothers whose children were sexually abused by their intimate male partners. Existential phenomenology was employed in the study, and Braun and Clarke's (2006) six-phase thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. The results indicate that the participants experienced emotions similar to those following loss including disbelief, anger, guilt, depression, trust and blame.



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pdf.png Therapists’ Experience of Working with Suicidal Clients - By Gabriel Rossouw, Elizabeth Smythe and Peter Greener  

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This paper is based on a study of therapists' experiences of working with suicidal clients. Using a hermeneutic-phenomenological methodology informed by Heidegger, the study provides an understanding of the meaning of therapists' experiences from their perspective as mental health professionals in New Zealand. In this regard, the findings of the study identified three themes: Therapists' reaction of shock upon learning of the suicide of their client; Therapists' experience of assessing suicidal clients as a burden; and finally, Therapists' professional and personal crises as a result of their experiences and struggling to come to terms with events.

The study sheds light on how the experiences of therapists whose clients have committed suicide can be understood. The findings show how mainstream prevention and intervention strategies result from the misrepresentation and misinterpretation of our traditional way of knowing what it means to be human. When therapists discover that phenomena are not necessarily what they appear to be, they feel unsettled and confused about their responsibilities and what it means to live and die as a human being. The study reveals that therapists experience a profound legacy of guilt, doubt and fear when a client commits suicide. Finally, the study proposes that the time has come for the profession to care for its own in order to allow therapist, in turn to care for (and about) the vulnerable other.



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pdf.png The “Lived Pain” Experience: The Case of Women Undergoing IVF treatments - By Hilla Ha’elyon and Chen Gross  

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This research used the embodied approach to analyse the pain experiences of 25 heterosexually married Israeli-Jewish women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatments for a first pregnancy. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to allow the women to openly discuss issues concerning their perceptions of pain. Research findings show that the women's pain perceptions dictated two distinct categories of discourse. The first category of discourse surfaced in the accounts of 14 of the interviewees. Women belonging to this category expressed their willingness to "do everything for a child". These women insisted on silencing pain and considered it to be irrelevant. They refused to locate bodily pains at the centre of their experience, fearing that this would delay their goal of reproducing. The second discourse of pain emerged from the accounts of 11 interviewees. This discourse was associated with women's motivation to maintain an active dialogue with painful experiences. They obstinately sought to direct internal attentiveness to what was happening inside their bodies. This approach enabled them to define body boundaries and form an active negotiation with the authority treating their bodies. The research findings suggest that women who share the same socio-cultural environment (Israeli pronatalism) and physical circumstances (the inability to conceive) have varied and wide- ranging interpretations of pain. It seems that medical authorities can benefit the understanding of pain by providing new support resources to women undergoing IVF treatments.



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pdf.png Leadership: Wisdom in Action - By Elizabeth Smythe and Andrew Norton  

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The purpose of this paper is to reveal how the thinking of leadership is always in 'play' enacting the wisdom of practice. The 'know how' of leadership theory (techne) tends to assume that a plan, or a set of skills, can accomplish whatever one sets out to achieve. However, the nature of human and contextual encounter instead draws one into a dynamic relationship where all is in-play. To lead is to recognise the impact and primacy of play and to respond accordingly. For this research study, experienced leaders were interviewed and data was analysed drawing on the philosophical notions of Heidegger and Gadamer, using a phenomenological methodology. The findings indicate that 'know how' is not sufficient. Strong leadership requires wisdom that is enacted in the moment. In addition, 'who' the leader is matters, for in the dynamic of play leaders can only draw on their own integrity. Being attuned to the play also matters, for discerning mood, possibilities and threats prompt the leader's next move. Leadership that enables individuals to play with wisdom, foresight and sound judgement can only be learnt through experience. The implications are that emerging leaders need to be exposed to the play of leadership and to be mentored by experienced leaders who can share their wisdom.



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pdf.png Capture the Unexpressed: Anecdote as a Device in Hermeneutic Phenomenological Research - By Margareth Eilifsen  

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This paper explores the notion that an anecdote provides some form of experiential truth or "empirical evidence" in terms of fully comprehending an event or phenomenon. Eilifsen argues that although the facts of one's life are not unimportant they nonetheless do not necessarily tell the whole story, and that in terms of our 'lived experience', it is very often the thrust and sense of what lies between words and what is seemingly hidden in the patterns of the facts, rather than the facts themselves, that reveals the 'truth'.

Although not a novel idea, Eilifsen posits that the articulated use of anecdote in hermeneutic phenomenological research can indeed be a powerful tool in revealing much about a life lived even though the anecdote itself might not be 'factual'.



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pdf.png (Mis)Appropriations of Gadamer in Qualitative Research: A Husserlian Critique (Part 1) - By Marc H. Applebaum  

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Within the Husserlian phenomenological philosophical tradition, description and interpretation co-exist. However, teaching the practice of phenomenological psychological research requires careful articulation of the differences between a descriptive and an interpretive relationship to what is provided by qualitative data. If as researchers we neglect the epistemological foundations of our work or avoid working through difficult methodological issues, then our work invites dismissal as inadequate science, undermining the effort to strongly establish psychology along qualitative lines. The first article in this two-part discussion provides a Husserlian investigation of the meaning of 'method' for psychology as a human science. This investigation is undertaken in the light of some researchers' appropriations of Gadamer's philosophical hermeneutics in the service of non-methodical praxes. The second article will address some implications of the attempt to structure qualitative psychological research along 'Gadamerian' lines, taking seriously the references to Gadamer's work made by researchers such as Van Manen and Smith.

The author has published a follow-up paper in this journal:

Applebaum, M. H. (2014). Intentionality and Narrativity in Phenomenological Psychological Research: Reflections on Husserl and Ricoeur. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology, 14(2), 19 pp. doi: 10.2989/IPJP.2014.14.2.2.1241



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pdf.png BOOK REVIEW (by Larise du Plessis) - Mors et Vita: Keeping DEATH alive through Sorrow’s profiles  

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Richard J. Alapack (2010). Sorrow's Profiles: Grief, and Crisis in the Family. London, UK: Karnac Books.

Soft cover (376 pages)

ISBN-13: 978-1-85575-621-2



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